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The PERFORMA Commissions program originates new productions and supports artists in the creation of exceptional multi-media performances. PERFORMA works with artists from conceptualization to presentation, providing financial and production support, including touring.


PERFORMA RADIO

Radio works by visual artists

PERFORMA RADIO expands the field of performance to include radio-space, with works by visual artists specifically designed for radio broadcast, including several world premieres. Presented by PERFORMA05,? WFMU (91.1FM-NY and www.wfmu.org ), and WKCR (89.9FM-NY and www.wkcr.org )






PERFORMA RADIO features live and recorded performances, and interventions, radio dramas, monologues, sound works, conceptual works, historical radio pieces, and participating artists discuss their use of radio as an artistic medium.

Curated by SculptureCentre Curator Anthony Huberman for PERFORMA05, with special thanks to Bethany Ryker (WFMU) and Federico Marulanda (WKCR).

SCHEDULE
November 6, 9-10 pm, WFMU 91.1FM: Tom Johnson, Mungo Thomson, and Ceal Floyer
November 11, 9-10 pm, WKCR 89.9FM: Lucy Raven, Banks Violette/Stephen O’Malley, John Tremblay
November 18, 9-10 pm, WKCR 89.9FM: Jamie Isenstein, Michael Smith, Nina Katchadourian
November 20, 9-10 pm, WFMU 91.1FM: Pierre Huyghe, Bruce Pearson, Free Radio High Desert Test Site, Peter Coffin



Participating Artists:

Peter Coffin
Ceal Floyer
Free Radio High Desert Test Site
Pierre Huyghe
Jamie Isenstein
Tom Johnson
Nina Katchadourian
Bruce Pearson
Lucy Raven
Michael Smith
Mungo Thomson
John Tremblay
Banks Violette











Peter Coffin
Inspired by the computer voice that reports the exact time to callers of a special phone number, Peter Coffin has sampled his own voice to create a radio work that recites the time precisely nine minutes fast, to account for the standard “snooze” delay on radio-alarm clocks.? Broadcast during brief moments in between other works, the artist??s automatedvoice serves as PERFORMA Radio??s ongoing time-keeper.

Ceal Floyer
The Goldberg Variations was originally composed by Bach as a Baroque keyboard exercise in musical structure and reasoning. It subsequently became a standard in classical keyboard repertoire, consisting of 30 variations of a single aria. In her audio work of the same name, Ceal Floyer takes the initial prototype aria as her starting point, simultaneously presenting all the different piano recordings and interpretations of it that she could find commercially. The condensation of the individual versions into one composite playfully acknowledges and articulates the conceptual themes of the original.


Free Radio High Desert Test Site
Invited by Andrea Zittel to propose a project for her High Desert Test Site series in Joshua Tree, Christy Gast and Fabienne Lasserre created a radio station. Dozens of artists contributed works that they considered complementary to, or missing in, the desert Nevada landscape and airspace. Including works by Gast and Lassere, Justin Beal, Bjorn Melhus, Lisi Raskin, Halsey Rodman, Anna Craycroft, and Yoko Ono, among others. Excerpts of the Free Radio HDTS programming, as well as an interview by Anthony Huberman with artists Fabienne Lasserre and Christy Gast , will be broadcast, on Sunday November 20 at 9pm to 10 pm, on WFMU.



Pierre Huyghe
Pierre Huyghe has conceptualized his newest project in three parts: a trip to Antartica on a radio ice-boat, a film from the trip, and, with the Public Art Fund and the 2006 Whitney Biennial, a public performance in Central Park??s Wolman Ice Skating Rink. For PERFORMA Radio, the artist adds a fourth layer to his expedition by creating a radio play. Amidst the soundtrack Huyghe commissioned for this upcoming film, a witness of his Central Park performance engages in a play-by-play description of the event. A theatrical representation of a search for an Antarctic creature merges with the memory of radio drama to become yet another story.



Jamie Isenstein
Jamie Isenstein??s contribution is a parody of an old-fashioned radio ventriloquism show. On this episode of Inside Out with Jamie Isenstein, the artist interviews her own skeleton and her Suave Brand Skin Therapy Moisturizing Lotion, which proceeds to promote its book Surface Tension: The Changing Face of American Culture, which looks at the effects of plastic surgery on popular music.



Tom Johnson
Tom Johnson is a sculptor who also creates spoken performances. He presents a new twenty-five minute spoken piece for radio. Taking himself as the form he is most familiar with, Johnson uses words to chip away at himself and mine his self-perception and self-consciousness. His monologue is taught with confession and vulnerability and is set in dialogue with the expectation of radio as an intimate medium, encountered mostly alone or at home.



Nina Katchadourian
Nina Katchadourian presents Wanted, an audio work from 1995 (a collaboration with Julia Meltzer), in which an ad was placed in the Village Voice advertising a fictitious studio apartment for rent with the dimensions 6×9 x 7 feet, the size of a standard American jail cell. Eager to see the room, 117 callers left messages on her answering machine during the first 24 hours alone, providing personal details and eccentric requests in the form of disembodied voices.



Bruce Pearson
An avid record collector, painter Bruce Pearson compresses a massive archive of records into a few minutes. Extracting only the percussion from hundreds of songs, he loops each drum sample, adding a new one every few seconds, until the whole becomes a mass of stacked sound. An exploration of what happens when silence is removed from the musical equation, this new work consists of a gradual accumulation of sampled beats to the point that they create a solid mass. He collaborates with Marco A. Navarrete.



Lucy Raven
During her recent stay at the Center for Land Use Interpretation??s residency in Utah, Lucy Raven collaborated with Olivia Robinson and Jesse Stiles, reporting from inside the Wendover airbase, once the home of the Enola Gay, and the atomic bombs named Fat Man and Little Boy. From the base, the artists relay signals and communicate with correspondents in Los Alamos, in a radio exchange that crosses over the emptiest airspace in the country, picking up chatter and wind in between. This new site-specific sound work is based on military radio communications.



Michael Smith
Michael Smith presents a collection of his audio works from the 1970s and 1980s. His selection of droll, minimal sketches are as much about timing, inflection and delivery as they are about witnessing the workings of one??s mind trying to make sense. On the radio, his mundane everyday observations replace a traditional talk show.



Mungo Thomson
For The Collected Live Recording of Bob Dylan 1963-1995, Mungo Thompson has compiled the applause from Bob Dylan??s live albums. Beginning with a banned appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1963 and closing with an MTV Unplugged session in 1995, the 30-minute work abstractly captures a history of Dylan??s audiences and turns radio space into a place of celebration and unrewarded expectations.



John Tremblay
In the mid-1990s, John Tremblay made many field recordings on the streets of New York on lo-fi micro-cassette. Capturing music and spontaneous quips from colorful characters, excerpts from his collection of tapes offer a few dense minutes of raw energy from a time few people think about anymore. Ambient noises join unkempt commentaries to create a street-level archive of New York??s cultural fringes.



Banks Violette
In collaboration with heavy-metal musician Stephen O??Malley, Banks Violette reverse-engineers a radio broadcast. In preparation for his live on-air performance, the two artists compose and record a new musical track. In the broadcast booth, the artists transform their produced product into un-produced chaos by systematically decomposing and fracturing their own compositional efforts.

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